Supply & Demand Model

How many nurses will NC have in the future? How many nurses will NC need in the future? How does supply and demand of nurses look in different regions of NC and practice settings? Check the nursecast!

NC Nursecast is an interactive, web-based tool that forecasts the future supply and demand for Registered Nurses (RNs) and Licensed Practical Nurses (LPNs) in various practice settings in North Carolina. The tool draws on historical data from the NC Board of Nursing/Health Professions Data System, population data from the NC Office of Budget and Analysis, and expert input from an advisory committee to provide baseline estimates of how many nurses NC will have and how many nurses will be demanded in NC by region and by setting. The model also provides alternative scenarios to explore the potential outcome if nurses leave practice earlier than expected, if more students graduate from nursing programs, or if fewer nurses come to NC from out of state.

If you’d like to learn more about how to use the model, you can look at our brief written guide or watch the video below.

Otherwise, scroll down to the boxes below and select whether you’d like to see supply and demand together (as a % or an absolute number), or supply separately, or demand separately. From there the toolbar on the left-hand side of the screen offers you options regarding what you would like to see forecast in the model.
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Explore

Supply & Demand

Want to learn about the future supply and demand of our state's licensed practical nurses and registered nurses across settings and geographic regions?

See projections

Graduate Diffusion

Want to see how different North Carolina nursing programs impact the distribution of health professionals in their area and across the state?

Examine graduate diffusion

Key Findings

What are the main takeaways from the nursecast projections? In what regions and settings will nurses be in shortage?

Read key findings

Who are we?

This project is brought to you by The Cecil G. Sheps Center For Health Services Research at the University of North Carolina in partnership with the North Carolina Board of Nursing.